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Posts Tagged ‘TREE-age’

Here we are, it’s baseball season.  As a fan, I thought that you might like to know about the concerns that Louisville Slugger has about the Emerald Ash Borer.

As you are aware, baseball bats are made from Ash trees.  In a past article in the Cincinnati Enquirer, the City of Cincinnati said that they had also thought about approaching Louisville Slugger with the opportunity to buy Ash trees.

The problem is that the baseball bat manufacturer has contracts for lumber from Pennsylvania.  And those trees are also threatened by the Emerald Ash Borer.

You can read more on the Emerald Ash Borer and Louisville Slugger by clicking  here.

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It seems like every day we get questions on the cost of removal vs. treatment.  There are many variables such as ease of access to do the removal, is the tree healthy, can it be saved, labor costs, insurance cost,  etc. etc.

The best document that I have seen in terms of giving cost estimates is The Potential Economic Impacts of Emerald Ash Borer
(Agrilus planipennis) on Ohio, U.S., Communities, by
T. Davis Sydnor, Matthew Bumgardner, and Andrew Todd.

Here is a chart that simplifies their findings for the private owner.  The average tree was 12.4 inches in dbh.  dbh is the diameter of the tree at breast height, or 4.5 feet above the base of the tree.

You can get a copy by clicking on the table above.

Of course one might find suitable replacements at a lower cost, or maybe the removal service is higher or lower in your area.  But this chart gives a good rule of thumb for the private owner.

In contrast, by treating that same 12.4 inch dbh average tree with TREE-age and the ArborJet injection system, that same tree could be treated for only

$149.

And one treatment has been proven to protect ash trees for three years.  So in terms of cost to treat vs. cost to remove, it looks like a no-brainer to treat the trees.

The way that treatment is calculated is on the total accumulated dbh inches.  In other words, you might have two, or three, ash trees that total 12.4 inches dbh.  If you have many ash trees there would be discounts for certain quantity levels, but the measurement is in total dbh inches for all the trees, not by the individual tree.

In order to ensure that tree health is preserved, Back Tree Service recommends that the tree owner also have the ash tree vertical mulched using a pneumatic vertical mulching tool.

Landscape Value Removal Cost, Tree and Stump Replacement Cost With 2.4″ Tree (Retail) Total Cost per Tree
$807 $675 $290 $1,772

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After three years of planning, Tim Back has transitioned his company from a tree removal company to saving trees.  The auction of tree removal equipment yesterday exceeded expectations, and has positioned Back Tree Service to focus on treating and saving trees rather than removing them.

Jeff McKinney of the Cincinnati Enquirer wrote a great article on Tim  changing the Back Tree Service business model in order to focus on treating ash trees in the Greater Cincinnati tree service area in order to protect them from the ravages of Emerald Ash Borer.

You can read the entire article by clicking on the image below.

This article covers the auction and the reasons behind it.

You can read about how to identify the Emerald Ash Borer by clicking on this link http://www.backtree.com/emerald-ash-borer.php

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In June 2009 a research report on Ash tree treatment for the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was published by scientific investigators from Ohio State University, Purdue University, Michigan State University and University of Michigan, and University of Illinois.

Their findings identified the most effective treatment for the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was emmamectin benzoate.

“A new product that is effective for two years or even longer (emamectin benzoate) has altered the economics of treating ash trees…

Emamectin benzoate is the only product tested to date that controls EAB for more than one year with a single application.

It also provided a higher level of control than other products in side-by-side studies.”

You can read the entire report by clicking on the report cover below.


Herms DA, McCullough DG, Smitley DR, Sadof C, Williamson RC, and Nixon PL. 2009.
Insecticide options for protecting ash trees from emerald ash borer. North Central IPM Center Bulletin. 12 pp.

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Ask these questions…

1.  Are they Certified Arborists?

2.  Is the company ArborJet endorsed?

3.  Do they have a written guarantee for their treatment?

Guarantee



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Pneumatic Vertical Mulching and Fertilizing is an integral part of our system for treating and protecting ash trees from the Emerald Ash Borer.

Here is an excerpt from the Arborists’ Certification Study Guide explains what soil compaction is.  And the best solution is Pneumatic Vertical Mulching.

“Compaction is one of the biggest problems in urban soils.  Compaction is often caused by construction, foot or vehicular traffic, engineered soils to support roads or buildings, or other factors.

Compaction reduces total pore space and the proportion of macropores to micropores.  Loams, silt loams, and other soils with a variety of particle sizes may be particularly vulnerable to compaction because small particles are pressed into large core spaces between particles.

Trees and soils are so ecologically independent that it is hard to imaging separating them from one another.  Yet the processes involved with urban development disrupt this ecological balance, creating growing conditions that may range from unfavorable to antagonistic.

It has been said that the vast majority of tree decline situations can be attributed to an initial soil stress.

Trees are living systems driven by energy.  They must obtain sufficient oxygen, water, essential elements and other components from the soil to meet their energy requirements.

Understanding soil is vital to arboriculture because soil is, quite literally, the foundation within which a tree grows.”

From page 32 of the Arborists’ Certification Study Guide, by Sharon Lilly, International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).

Pneumatic Vertical Mulching and Fertilizing, along with regular treatment of ash trees with TREE-age, is why Back Tree Service offers a 100% money back guarantee.  You can read the guarantee by clicking on the image below.

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The mindset in Cincinnati, with respect to the Emerald Ash Borer, stems from influential people that preached the message “your ash trees are doomed.”

Here is an article from October, 2006 that captures that mindset.  Rapid advances in treatment technology have proven many of these perceptions to be inaccurate today, but people still believe them.

“Ash trees… doomed to death from attacks by the emerald ash borer. Some say it will be within the next year; others predict the destruction over the next five to 10 years.”

“…we have little data to suggest that continual, annual applications will keep borers out of any specific ash tree.”

Check out this paper by professors from OSU, Michigan State, University of Wisconson,  and Purdue.  It has lots of data!

“The best treatments are not 100 percent effective and, eventually, the insects will infest a treated tree and kill it.”

Today there is a treatment system that is 100% effective, and guaranteed.  See the above paper.


seek a written guarantee… there are no guarantees.”

Back Tree Service has a 100% guarantee.  You can see it here.

Guarantee

“The emerald ash borer is the second devastating insect attack the last 60 years. Dutch elm disease wiped out thousands of elm trees in the 1950s and 60s.”

That was a disease that was carried by insects, the EAB is an insect that destroys the tree.  But if we destroy and replace trees, every time and choose not to treat them, then what is the true cost over time?

To learn how you can identify the Emerald Ash Borer click on this link  http://www.backtree.com/emerald-ash-borer.php

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“Ash trees… doomed to death from attacks by the emerald ash borer. Some say it will be within the next year; others predict the destruction over the next five to 10 years.”
“…we have little data to suggest that continual, annual applications will keep borers out of any specific ash tree.
“The best treatments are not 100 percent effective and, eventually, the insects will infest a treated tree and kill it.”
seek a written guarantee… there are no guarantees.”
“The emerald ash borer is the second devastating insect attack the last 60 years. Dutch elm disease wiped out thousands of elm trees in the 1950s and 60s.”

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